MIS535 Case Analysis Discussions Week 5

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MIS535 Case Analysis Discussions Week 5
The FCC’s now abandoned rules also protected your privacy, in that they stopped internet…

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MIS535 Case Analysis Discussions Week 5

MIS535 Case Analysis Discussions Week 5

All Students Posts – 42 Pages 

In this discussion, you will view the voice threads submitted by the other teams and comment on at least 3 of them.

The FCC’s now abandoned rules also protected your privacy, in that they stopped internet service providers (ISPs) from using your personal information, app usage and browsing history in certain ways—namely, it would have stopped them from sharing it or selling it to a third party unless you, the user, had given express consent.

Now, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), under whose remit ISPs now fall, does not require a user to affirmatively opt-in to allow ISPs to engage in this sort of behaviour; FTC rules only state that a user has to be able to opt-out. Of course, many don’t realise this, and therefore don’t.

Even worse: a 2016 Court of Appeals decision actually means that the FTC can’t stop ISPs from selling your data at all—even if you opt out of this. The decision essentially means that if an ISP provides a “common carrier” service, such a mobile or fixed-line telephone service, the FTC can’t enforce its laws against any of its services. Most ISPs, of course, also offer phone service, putting them beyond the FTC’s rules.

So Net Neutrality isn’t just about keeping the internet a fair and open place. It’s about protecting your privacy and consumer rights, and if we lose the Net Neutrality rules, we lose a lot of our privacy protections too.