NETW563 Course Discussions Week 5

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NETW563 Course Discussions Week 5
Discuss the role of a software agent in SNMP, and explain the purpose of the MIB…

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NETW563 Course Discussions Week 5

NETW563 Course Discussions Week 5

All Students Posts – 52 Pages 

SNMP – 26 Pages 

SNMP is a protocol that allows computers and network equipment to gather data about network performance. It is part of the TCP/IP protocol suite. Discuss the role of a software agent in SNMP, and explain the purpose of the MIB. Explain how the SNMP management station gathers data, and describe the types of data that it collects and stores. Discuss how this information can be used for monitoring.

The SNMP manager sends query request to SNMP agents with correct credentials. The agents then gather information about the local system and store them in a format that can be queried from a continuous updated database called MIB (management information base). The SNMP agent then configures which SNMP managers have access to the information and can also act as in intermediary to report information on devices it can connect to that are not configured for SNMP traffic. Some of the commands that the agents use to collect the data is GetRequest, GetNextRequest, and GetBulkRequest…

Troubleshooting – 26 Pages 

Define the term troubleshooting. What does it mean to you? Discuss why troubleshooting wireless networks can be more challenging than troubleshooting wired networks. Please back up your posts with supporting evidence.  When you are in the networking domain, you will hear the term “troubleshooting” a lot. What does it mean in particular?  Which is more challenging to troubleshoot, wireless or wired networks and why?

Troubleshooting means that there is a “problem” and now you have start looking into it to identify the actual issue and then work on resolving that issue.

Wired Networks can be easier to troubleshoot than wireless networks because there are actual parts connecting devices together instead of dead air.  Wired networks are not a maze of antennas, signal strengths and fading.   You can see and trace the problem from device to another with minor stress.

Wireless networks require you to dig deeper into them to find out where the problem lays.  We know that it is not a cable that connects them all together so we can either diagnose the cables that are each individual device, the signal between the devices or something internal to each device.

Security can also be taken out for the most part in a wired network.  If you can see the wires of the network then you can assume that no one is physically inside your system. Wireless networks open avenues for people to try and gain access without even being by the devices…