SEC360 Discussions Week 5

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SEC360 Discussions Week 5
Why are backups so often overlooked in an organization? How do we sell the benefits of spending money on backup solutions…

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SEC360 Discussions Week 5

SEC360 Discussions Week 5

All Students Posts 32 Pages 

Backup and Recovery Planning – 17 Pages 

Why are backups so often overlooked in an organization? How do we sell the benefits of spending money on backup solutions to business managers and executives? Now that system are redundant, do we still need backup and recovery plans?

Backups and recovery is still very important even in this age of redundancy, just in case the primary version is loss, corrupted, or a potential system failure. So if any of these things were to happen you would have to restore the data and the full working environment, but none of this…

For a company it is essential to have some kind of backups especially to their sensitive material. Backups are important because when a natural disaster or any event happen not…

Access Control Lists – 15 Pages 

Access control lists are very valuable for administering granular control over an organization’s resources. So why do a lot of organizations opt not to use them in lieu of more general super user or administrator accounts? It is a challenge to remove administrator rights from users? What strategy should be used? Do you think common users need admin rights? How would you handle software installation at the local level?

A discretionary access control list (DACL) identifies the trustees that are allowed or denied access to a securable object. When a process tries to access a securable object, the system checks the ACEs in the object’s DACL to determine whether to grant access to it. If the object does not have a DACL, the system grants full access to everyone. If the object’s DACL has no ACEs, the system denies all attempts to access the object because the DACL does not allow any access rights. The system checks the ACEs in sequence until it finds one or more ACEs that allow all the requested access rights, or until any of the requested access rights are denied. For more information, see How DACLs Control Access to an Object. For information about how to properly create a DACL, see Creating a DACL…